HOW TO EVALUATE THE SCANNER ON REAL MESSAGE SYSTEMS

The Cloud Security Alliance (CSA) is the world’s leading organization

The Cloud Security Alliance (CSA) is the world’s leading organization dedicated to defining and raising awareness of best practices to help ensure a secure cloud computing environment. CSA harnesses the subject matter expertise of industry practitioners, associations, governments, and its corporate and individual members to offer cloud security-specific research, education, certification, events and products. CSA’s activities, knowledge and extensive network benefit the entire community impacted by cloud — from providers and customers, to governments, entrepreneurs and the assurance industry — and provide a forum through which diverse parties can work together to create and maintain a trusted cloud ecosystem. CSA operates the most popular cloud security provider certification program, the CSA Security, Trust & Assurance Registry (STAR), a three-tiered provider assurance program of self assessment, 3rd party audit and continuous monitoring. CSA launched the industry’s first cloud security user certification in 2010, the Certificate of Cloud Security Knowledge (CCSK), the benchmark for professional competency in cloud computing security. CSA’s comprehensive research program works in collaboration with industry, higher education and government on a global basis. CSA research prides itself on vendor neutrality, agility and integrity of results. CSA has a presence in every continent except Antarctica. With our own offices, partnerships, member organizations and chapters, there are always CSA experts near you. CSA holds dozens of high quality educational events around the world and online. Please check out our events page for more information.

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As more businesses move to the cloud and as cloud services continue to grow, organizations must establish a unified set of cloud security and governance controls for business-critical SaaS applications and IaaS resources. In most cases, cloud providers will have stronger security than any individual company can maintain and manage on-premise. However, each new service comes with it’s own security capabilities, which can increase risks because of feature gaps or human error during configuration. Adding additional encryption and policy controls independently of the vendor, is a proven way for organizations to fully entrust their data to a cloud provider without giving up complete control over who can access it while also making sure employees are compliant when using SaaS applications. These controls allow businesses to move at the speed of the cloud without placing their data at risk.

In addition to traditional privilege management, the cloud also introduces a unique challenge when it comes to cloud service providers. Since they can access your cloud instance, it’s important to factor into your cloud risk assessment that your cloud provider also has access to your data. If you’re concerned about insider threats or government data requests served directly to the cloud provider, evaluating options to segregate data from your cloud provider is recommended.

The Cloud Security Alliance today has announced the availability of version 1.0 of the CSA Cloud Controls Matrix, a catalog of cloud security controls aligned with key information security regulations, standards and frameworks.

With the growth in cloud computing, businesses rely on the network to access information about operational assets being stored away from the local server. Decoupling information assets from other operational assets could result in poor operational resiliency if the cloud is compromised. Therefore, to keep the operational resiliency unaffected, it is essential to bolster information asset resiliency in the cloud. To study the resiliency of cloud computing, the CSA formed a research team consisting of members from both private and public sectors within the Incident Management and Forensics Working Group and the Cloud Cyber Incident Sharing Center. To measure cyber resiliency, the team leveraged a model developed to measure the resiliency of a community after an earthquake. Expanding this model to cybersecurity introduced two new variables that could be used to improve cyber resiliency. Elapsed Time to Identify Failure (ETIF) Elapsed Time to Identify Threat (ETIT) Measuring these and developing processes to lower the values of ETIF and ETIT can improve the resiliency of an information system. The study also looked at recent cyberattacks and measured ETIF for each of the attacks. The result showed that the forensic analysis process is not standard across all industries and, as such, the data in the public domain are not comparable. Therefore, to improve cyber resiliency, the team recommends that the calculation and publication of ETIF be transferred to an independent body (such as companies in IDS space) from the companies that experienced cyberattacks. A technical framework and appropriate regulatory framework need to be created to enable the measurement and reporting of ETIF and ETIT. Download the full study.

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